Tiffen Color Viewing Filter #2

49
  • Filmtools #: 2905
  • Mfr #: 2CVF
In Stock
Product Features
  • For film speeds to 10
  • Designed to handicap the eye with its much greater range of apparent densities to resemble the range of the various types of film

Availability: In stock

You Pay: $49.00
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  • Overview

    The Tiffen Color Viewing Filter #2 permits visual judging and interpretation of a scene by compressing the scene's brightness contrast-range to that of the film.

    Principle:
    When a scene is viewed through a Viewing Filter the brightness reaching the eye is reduced sufficiently to show not only the general appearance of the scene as it will appear on film, but also weather the lighting contrast is correct for the particular type of film in use. "Hot" areas that may "burn up" and dark areas that may be underexposed are more readily discernible through the Viewing Filter than the naked eye.

    To Use:
    When looking through the Tiffen Viewing Filter carefully check highlights and dark areas. If the shadow appear blocked up and lacking in detail, this is how it will appear on film, unless corrective lighting is applied. Do not lighten the shadows by increasing the exposure, as this is only likely to overexpose or "burn out" the highlights.

    The correct procedure is to reduce the lighting contrast and the simplest way to do this is to use a fill light or reflector for the dark areas.

The Tiffen Color Viewing Filter #2 permits visual judging and interpretation of a scene by compressing the scene's brightness contrast-range to that of the film.

Principle:
When a scene is viewed through a Viewing Filter the brightness reaching the eye is reduced sufficiently to show not only the general appearance of the scene as it will appear on film, but also weather the lighting contrast is correct for the particular type of film in use. "Hot" areas that may "burn up" and dark areas that may be underexposed are more readily discernible through the Viewing Filter than the naked eye.

To Use:
When looking through the Tiffen Viewing Filter carefully check highlights and dark areas. If the shadow appear blocked up and lacking in detail, this is how it will appear on film, unless corrective lighting is applied. Do not lighten the shadows by increasing the exposure, as this is only likely to overexpose or "burn out" the highlights.

The correct procedure is to reduce the lighting contrast and the simplest way to do this is to use a fill light or reflector for the dark areas.